Invoice Declarations

          Trade Agreements (to which Invoice Declarations relate) are a topic on their own. One agreement which may be specified on the commercial invoice (in lieu of using a Certificate as proof) for preferential duty purposes is the EU (European Union) Trade Agreement. This agreement was established between the EU and certain countries in the SADC (Southern African Development Community).

          The EU Trade Agreement was changed on 10 October 2016. It was previously known as the TDCA (Trade Development and Co-Operation Agreement). Today it known as the SADC-EPA (Economic Partnership Agreement). This agreement now includes not only South Africa but also Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Swaziland and Mozambique on the SADC side, as participants.   

          Invoice Declarations also apply to the agreement between the EFTA (European Free Trade Area) countries and South Africa. 

          The use of Invoice Declarations is allowed by exporters who are approved by the Customs authority in the export country; to insert an Invoice Declaration on the commercial invoice. This may be applied in lieu of the EUR1 (EU) or EFTA Certificates respectively. 

          Approved exporters are issued with an Authorisation Number by Customs. This number must be inserted into the Invoice Declaration when used. It applies to invoices where the total value of originating products in the consignment is EUR 6,000 or more. Consignments with originating products valued at less than EUR 6,000 do not require the Authorisation Number although the invoice declaration may still be used, i.e. by exporters who are not approved. 

          An invoice declaration may only be used on a commercial document such as an invoice, packing list or indent order. SARS does not accept invoice declarations to be used on blanket supplier’s declarations covering multiple shipments or on correspondence of any sort. 

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