Knowing your Rights: The Customs Demand

          Pay now, dispute later… really! Yes really. Your consignment was stopped, your production line is threatened, Customs has a finding and they want you to pay. Both sides have a material interest in the concept of “pay now, dispute later”.

          For live shipments this could present a real problem. Until such time as all outstanding issues are settled your shipment will not be released. This is where your supporting documents and literature (discussed in former blogs) become essential. There are occasions when Customs notifications for administrative action are illogical. But the illogicality thereof can only be proven upon the production of supporting documents and explanations. Your LSP (Logistics Service Provider) will want to upload supporting documents to the Customs electronic system speedily; in order to obviate the action demanded.

          But some traders whose production line is at risk can simply not wait, no matter how illogical. They would prefer to comply with any demand, especially when smaller penalty amounts are involved.

          This approach is going to present problems in terms of the new Customs legislation. Minimum first penalties will be R 2,500 (in the Control Act) and R 5,000 (in the Duty Act). Each subsequent penalty covering the same contravention will thereafter double-up. This rationale will be applied over a period of three years where after your records will be wiped clean to start afresh.

          Another consequence of accepting an illogical decision is the precedence it creates. Once accepted and paid, Customs may expect that subsequent shipments must be treated in the same illogical manner. Also, Customs Post Clearance Inspection Teams will want you to bring additional duties and VAT to account for all prior shipments going 2 years back (this will be 3 years in the new Customs legislation).

          Another big concern about simply paying now and disputing later is that winning disputes with SARS Customs is difficult. In many instances it requires real expertise to appeal a decision. Doing so may occasionally involve employing an expert and paying a consulting fee for such expertise.

          But, any win in the appeals process will help to improve your record of good standing. Therefore, if you have any inclination whatsoever that you may win a dispute with SARS, then you simply must appeal.

          If the Customs findings fall into a grey area of uncertainty, there is another course of action you can take. You can lodge a provisional payment as surety to cover the potential difference in duties and VAT and to cover any penalties, pending finalisation of the matter. These normally relate to Customs Determinations for tariff and valuations. You will still pay initially however, the amounts paid pending a firm decision vide a firm Ruling (i.e. Determination) by the Commissioner for SARS will serve as surety during which time you can appeal. Such sureties are refundable upon a favourable outcome of any Determination.

          Nowadays it is not uncommon for Traders (and even LSPs) to pay for legal and technical expertise to aid in the appeals process. The avoidance of unintended consequences is far more appealing.

          Finally, court action may be another alternative however; this is a whole new league of appeal and will not be covered here.

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